That Was the Week That Was

By Marlena De Lacroix a.k.a.  Connie Passalacqua Hayman

I can barely remember a daytime soap week that had as much breaking news as this one.  Here’s a peek into Marlena’s reporting notebook:

Ian Buchanan


I am stunned that General Hospital (Frank Valentini, executive producer; Ron Carlivati, headwriter)  has  fired Ian Buchanan (Duke Lavery).  It is just so wrong!  Ian is … Ian!  What a magnificent  actor he is, not to mention that he is a soap icon.  He and the equally magnificent  Finola Hughes (Anna Devane) comprise one of the greatest soap couples of  all time. Their story of conflicted love has always been a total winner.  The role of Duke was briefly played by a badly miscast Greg Beecroft (Guiding Light, One Life to Live) during a  23-year break Ian took from the show when  Duke was believed dead.  I .sincerely  hope they don’t kill Duke off for good this time!  Ian is so valuable to GH  and so  beloved by the fans.


Today I learned  the news that Wally Kurth, who has done double duty recurring on both  General Hospital as Ned Ashton and  Days of Our Lives as Justin Kiriakis, has been given a contract on Days. (Justin left Salem again just a month ago.)  I love Wally the Great and  will miss him terribly on GH.  Days is very smart to snap up Kurth.

More Tuesday

It’s Daytime Emmy time again. Oy!  The nominees were announced today.  The awards  will be presented April 26th on POP. That it’s back on TV after last year’s online  debacle  is great!

The nominations were announced  on CBS’ The Talk (I’m a View girl myself ).   They devoted only the first twenty minutes of the show to rattling off the noms, and it was done  in the studio.  Couldn’t they at least have done a remote to the announcement ceremonies themselves?  Remember the days when all three major networks covered the announcement ceremony live?  Doesn’t  daytime  deserve  better?

As you know, Emmy judgment isn’t based on an actor’s overall work, but rather on a reel of scenes from the last year that each actor and show  submit to a panel of judges at ATAS, the organization that administers the Daytime Emmys.  Great care goes into selecting these scenes; they are chosen by the actors themselves, and naturally they  are the best  scenes of the year.

So far I have only seen one reel for Best Actress and it left me totally  exasperated.  It’s well known that the Emmy  judges usually select  a winner  who cries and carries on in the scenes on their reel.  On the reel I saw, the actress certainly did cry and carry on from start to finish.  We all  know hysterics aren’t  all there is to soap acting, and not always soap acting at its best. The great weeping and gnashing of teeth scenes alone are not representative of the varied and truly excellent  work we see on our  screen five days a week.

Much more on the nominations themselves  and the Daytime Emmys in this column as Emmy day approaches.

Tony Geary in Luke’s moment of truth (Photo from MichaelFairmanSoaps)


I cried and screamed  and carried on  myself today during GH’s gala  52nd anniversary show. Incroyable!   What a shocker or should I say a roller coaster ride of shocks this episode was.  During today’s episode, it was revealed that as a teenager, Luke  murdered both his mother and super abusive  father. The story was told in Luke’s flashbacks and through sister Pat’s (Dee Wallace) narration.  The flashbacks were wonderfully rendered in silvery black and white  (the way TV was back then). The day the murders happened in Port Charles coincides with the date of  the GH’s premiere, April 1, 1963.  The details in the early Spencer story were accurate to 1963 in the most minute ways — sets, costumes, hairdos, even the attitudes of men toward women.

In a sublime touch, all the main characters were played by current GH current cast members amongst those  Jason Thompson (Patrick) as Dr. Steve Hardy, originally played by John Beradino, and Rebecca Herbst (Elizabeth) as Nurse Jessie Brewer, the role played by Emily McLaughlin.  What wonderful performances all gave!  I hardly recognized Laura Wright (Carly) as Luke, Bobbie and Pat’s mother Lena. She was just amazing in this episode.

Speaking of amazing, there is only one word for our medium right now, and that is “Tony,” as in Tony Geary.  He was genius in this episode, but when isn’t he?

Two Tony scenes that stand out this week literally broke my heart.  The first one was set in the hospital room of Luke’s long lost sister Patricia. Luke  hadn’t seen her in decades.  In this scene he saw her for the first time.  The look on Luke’s face at that moment was such a mix of wonder, incredulity and love!  Geary embodies natural acting.

In the second, Fluke was holding Luke’s wife Tracy (the always brilliant Jane Elliot) his daughter  Lulu (Emme Rylan) and sister Patricia hostage in Pat’s hospital room, pointing  a gun at the three.  To save their lives Tracy slowly talked  Fluke  down, reminding  him how  much he loves  his family.  The strategy worked:    Fluke  turned back into Luke in mid conversation.  What a relief when he dropped the gun!   How harrowing Geary made Luke here!  From menace to angel in a few seconds!

As illustrated in this scene, Geary and Elliot continue to be the best acting duo on daytime television today after so many years on the show together.

Many fans are saying this is the best soap episode they’ve ever seen.  I think it it’s one of many in our long and distinguished daytime drama history.   What do you think? The comments section below awaits.

The Young and the Restless: Marlena says, “You, Sir, Are No Irwin Allen!”

Jess Walton’s Jill has survived the Y&R plane crash

By Marlena De Lccroix a.k.a. Connie Passalacqua Hayman

It’s way too early to judge the work of The Young and the Restless’ new executive producer Charles Pratt Jr. We’re familiar with his resume (head writer/executive/producer of All My Children, General Hospital, Santa Barbara and Sunset Beach, primetime producer of Melrose Place et al.) But he’s only been on the Y&R  job seven weeks. Even so, there are some early hints: This past week, the controversial Pratt launched four sweeps month stunt plots simultaneously in a snow storm!  Before we discuss them, however, let’s review Y&R’s week-old disaster plot action:

Plane Crash:  A plane flies to Chicago with a secretly blind Neil, his wife Hilary, his son Devon, Jill, Colin, Cane and Lily on board.  Neil announces to all that he is  not blind anymore and he knows Hilary and Devon are in love and having an affair because he secretly witnessed them sleeping together while they  thought Neil was blind. Neil has something undisclosed in his briefcase. Suddenly, the plane crashes and all survive on the ground unharmed except for Hilary, who is severely injured and comatose.  She periodically wakes up.  Devon goes off to find help.  Neal vanishes.

Building Collapse:  At the Undergound, Victor finds out Nikki is drinking again and confronts her.  The building the Underground is in collapses with Victor, Jack, Nikki, Phyllis, Avery, Joe, Nick and Sage trapped inside. In the rubble, all are unharmed except Jack who is severely injured and comatose but who periodically wakes up.  Victor rescues Jack with CPR. Nikki, Phyllis and Avery escape while help arrives.   Victor and Jack are trapped in the basement. A semi-comatose Jack, who has secretly known Victor’s dead son Adam is alive, utters the word “Adam” and Victor knows something crucial is up.

I Know What You Did Last Summer: On Valentine’s Day Abby inexplicably invites Kevin, the young marrieds Summer and Austin along with Mariah, Courtney, Noah and Fen to a cabin in the woods.  Fen secretly spikes the punch. Everyone collapses and then wakes up.  Austin falls out of the armoire, presumably dead.  All are accused, but especially Summer. Abby is suddenly disclosed kissing Austin the night before while Mariah confronts her. Outside, Austin’s body vanishes. The youths convene to discuss what to tell the police. Will they get their story straight? Did Austin fake his own death? Ho hum!

The Towering Inferno:  A fire suddenly breaks out at Lakeview Towers in lovers Chelsea and Billy’s apartment. Chelsea and all believe Chelsea’s late husband  Adam is dead, but the audience knows Adam is alive and secretly masquerading as Gabe. Sage and Adam/Gabe live next store to Billy and Chelsea  but  are absent when the fire starts.   Chelsea escapes with Katie and Johnny. Billy remains in the burning apartment with Connor. Billy is periodically comatose but wakes up.  Adam/Gabe arrives and rescues Connor  but leaves his enemy Billy in the smoke.  Later he returns and rescues Billy.  When last seen, Adam and Billy are escaping the burning building.

Oy vey!  Can you say overkill? The four disaster plots are achingly piled on.  Every daytime soap headwriter interweaves character storylines and hypes them in some shocking manner for sweeps month, but this is way too much of a fun thing.  A great role model for Pratt would be the late, great headwriter Jim Reilly (Days of Our Lives), a master creative genius at stunts, who was always original and never dreamed of doing his vastly entertaining and oft- hilarious sweeps stunt plots more than  one at a time.

Worse I’m incredibly annoyed that Pratt is copying his 2008-9 All My Children debut.  On that show, after his debut under the umbrella of a stunt tornado story, Pratt set the world’s soap stunt record with six, count’em six, starring such characters as Kendall, Bianca and Zach. Pratt’s entire AMC stint was much despised. .

Clearly Pratt’s muse for all of this is the late Irwin Allen, creator such 1970s classics as The Poseidon Adventure and The Towering Inferno, all of them unabashedly cheesy, over-the-top movie fun. His name identifies the disaster movie genre embraced by so many imitators then and since. But even Allen, who pioneered the burning set and the rock and roll camera to simulate thunderous explosions and building collapse, confined his story-telling to one disaster at a time. His formula called for intersecting human dramas of marriages saved and parents and children reconciled played out against the disaster du jour, in a world saved ultimately by heroic first responders and the selfless sacrifice of military personnel who die trying to save people.

Sentimental, exciting, romantic, heart-warming and even a bit tear-jerky. Pratt provides dollops of all these elements, and evidently the stew is tasty to some viewers – he did well in the coveted 18-34 ratings category two weeks ago.

But for moi, a soap must have some grounding in real life to be believable, and these unoriginal plots don’t make it. Pratt throws in everything including the kitchen sink, much of it disconnected and out of the blue. For example, this week, apropos of nothing, Police assistant Kevin in the cabin plot revealed he is also a short story writer who has written a story with a murder scenario that is similar to Austin’s death.   What?

Even worse is the fact that these multiple disaster plots are being produced by Jill Farren Phelps, who has done swell sweeps plots on six soaps. (Santa Barbara, Guiding Light, Another World, One Life to Live, General Hospital and Y&R ).  Her 35 year soap career is a soap phenomenon!   While some dislike her, I’ve always admired Phelps, if not all her plots. It is she who hired Pratt for Y&R after working with him on GH.  Phelps often has exquisite taste in her hires. Time will tell if this is one of those times.

Beside Phelps, what also redeems poorly written plots like these is the high quality of the actors and the production crew. Y&R has always had some of the best!   The sets, particularly the plane crash and building collapse, are wonderfully Irwin Allen-esque.  But the disaster plots are not at all organic to past or present Y&R, as created and headwritten by the late Bill Bell, who would NEVER do stunt plots, though some have been tried since he stepped down from the show in 1998.

Overall plot-saving kudos have to go to the actors, most of whom are longtime Y&R veterans and soap superstars like Peter Bergman, Eric Braeden and Melody Thomas Scott who play Jack, Victor and Nikki in the building collapse plot.  I’d also like to single out Kristoff St. John who is always great as Neil, but has been dynamite here and in his entire blind, wife Hilary unfaithful to Neil with his son Devon, plot.  The work of longtime vets like these and Tristan Rogers (Colin) and Jill (Jess Walton) in the plane crash plot, or Joshua  Morrow (Nick) and Gina Tognoni (Phyllis) also in the building collapse plot, or Melissa Claire Egan (Chelsea) in the Towering Inferno plot, make Pratt’s stale disaster stunt plots more  palatable.

And so this week the building collapse and plane crash aftermath go on.  Will I be watching?  Yes, I can’t take my eyes off Pratt’s own four-ring circus of disaster stunt plots. They are that bad,  By the end of his entire Y&R stint, will I have to ask if has there ever been a daytime headwriter who is as creatively impoverished as Pratt?   Hope not for all our sakes!

Sunday Reflections: General Hospital, Bold and Beautiful and Marlena’s Radio Days

By Marlena De Lacroix a.k.a. Connie Passalacqua Hayman

General Hospital:  Heather! Heather! Heather! That’s practically all the GH audience is seeing this summer.  Last month I praised multi-soap veteran actress Robin Mattson to the sky, placing her very much toward the top of the Soap Villains Hall of Fame (which I made up.)

Now it’s time to praise another GH actress, Lisa LoCicero, who plays Olivia Falconeri. 

But let’s first go back to LoCicero’s daytime debut in 1995, when Marlena was a newspaper columnist. I liked to interview only the best of young actors, and get them early on in their soap tenure. So shortly after LoCicero joined Loving as Jocelyn Roberts Brown (she later graduated to The City in the same role.)  I requested an interview with her because I thought she was so [Read more…]

David Selby as Abraham Lincoln at Ford’s Theatre

David Selby

Attention Dark Shadows fans: David Selby, remembered fondly as the romantic heartthrob Quentin Collins on that long-running soap of yore, is playing Abraham Lincoln in a new play, The Heavens Are Hung In Black, at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. 

Selby has played Lincoln twice before. But this time, he says, is different: “This play goes deeper than any Lincoln piece I’ve ever done.” The play is set in 1862, when Lincoln is grieving for the recent death of his 12-year-old son. At the same time, he’s grappling with the question of freeing the nation’s four million slaves, and ultimately decides to issue the Emancipation Proclamation.

Marlena’s alter ego, Connie Passalacqua Hayman, talks to Selby about his long and varied career in this interview for Theater Mania. The Heavens Are Hung In Black, by James Still, runs through March 8.



Daytime Emmy Noms 2008: The More Things Change, the More They Remain the Same

emmyBy Marlena De Lacroix

I first attended and wrote about the Daytime Emmys in 1980 and I should be over them by now.  But I continue, year after year, to be exasperated by the fact that two things never change.  1) No matter how many times they have been revised or have been updated over the years, the nomination and award processes are still inequitable and unfair.  2) There is always one irritating thing that happens along the way with either the nominations or awards that’s so egregious, Marlena explodes with rage!

This year it happened right away, as the nominations were announced on The View.  The person interviewed on the show as a daytime awards expert/prognosticator wasn’t anyone from the soap press or a soap publication or blog.  Instead, he was a senior writer from People magazine.  I’m sure Marc D’Agostino is a capable  guy, but does he dedicate 100% of his working time and career to the soaps, the way soap journalists do, day after day, year after year, decade after decade?  Marlena, who has moved on to teaching, was born and bred in the soap press and has great respect for young soap magazine writers and editors who have full-time jobs doing interviews and other reporting on soaps. They deserve the spotlight!

This is not the first time ABC has gone for a big time magazine writer over a poor soap press scribe in publicizing its show.  Years ago [Read more…]