Ridge Forrester: Master of B&B’s Universe

By Marlena De Lacroix a.k.a.  Connie Passalacqua Hayman

Thorsten Kaye, the new Ridge

Every soap opera needs a leading man.   But perhaps because Ridge Forrester seems to have been at the center of most plots since The Bold and the Beautiful debuted more than 25 years ago, he seems more like a Master of the Universe than just a plain leading man.

Born handsome and rich, the son of Eric and Stephanie Forrester (Massimo Marone, an old lover of Stephanie’s, is Ridge’s biological father)  Ridge has always had everything he wanted.  His father Eric is head of Forrester Creations, a leading couture house, and he himself is the fashion house’s leading designer.

Ridge’s problem has always been women.  Is it just because he is so attractive?  It seems that he’s always involved with two women at a time, whether it’s Valley Girl Brooke and the late Caroline Spencer (his late first wife) or Brooke and Taylor, another wife of his. Taylor, a beautiful psychiatrist, seemed to at least understand Ridge.  His attraction to Brooke, to whom he has been married three times, seems more physical, and the two certainly have had quite the tumultuous romance over the years.

Ridge was played by Ronn Moss from the role’s inception to 2012, when Moss suddenly left.  Ridge and Brooke broke up over the thinnest of pretexts (Ridge found a text message from Brooke’s former lover Deacon) and Ridge went to live in Paris. During that year, Stephanie suffered from cancer, and later died of the disease.  Ridge, a huge momma’s boy, didn’t even return for his mother’s funeral.

When Ridge did return at the end of last year, he was played by Englishman Thorsten Kaye, a fan favorite from his days on One Life to Live and All My Children. Kaye is of course a very different kind of actor from Moss, who seemed to own the role. Kaye’s Ridge is more introspective, but with his own Continental style delivers a Ridge who is just as much the self-absorbed, immature jerk he’s always been. And as always, Kaye is a treat to watch.  

Thus when the new Ridge returned, he seemed to be the perfect man, suddenly very soft and tender, especially sympathetic toward Brooke’s sister Katie.  Katie’s husband Bill had fallen in love with and run off with Brooke.  Bill and Ridge hate one another. Ridge seemed to be Katie’s knight in shining armor and the two made off together, even after Ridge initially almost married Brooke.  Right now, the two are having an idyllic romance and indeed Kaye and Heather Tom, who plays Katie, are probably the best acted couple in soapdom.

So it was a brilliant stroke when B&B shattered the image of the new perfect Ridge and had him make some moves at Forrester Creations that showed how arrogant and spoiled he could be.  He tried to have photographer Oliver fired and brother Rick ousted from his position as president of the company.  Both moves failed.

Eric offered him the presidency of the company should he and Katie break up.  But arrogant and wanting his way as always, Ridge refused.  Will Ridge Forrester be able to keep his new love Katie, and continue to have it all as B&B’s Master of the Universe?     

The Ho-Hum, Overly Violent Carly Kidnapping Denouement

By Marlena De Lacroix a.k.a. Connie Passalacqua Hayman

Laura Wright’s Carly: Of course she was rescued!

We’ve already said that General Hospital’s Heather-kidnapping-Carly plot was a big ho-hum. Heather tried to blame it on Franco, her son, who had previously tried to kill Heather, his mother. No surprise, the accusation went nowhere and the outcome was predictable: Carly, a central GH character, just had to be rescued. And what of Heather getting loose from the asylum? So what else is new? No institution has succeeded in keeping her locked up for the past thirty years.

Sorry to report that the denouement of the story in which Franco found Carly in the Wyndemere catacombs was every bit a disappointment, despite its excessive violence – calculated, perhaps, to cover the lackluster story in fake blood. First, Franco was shot escaping prison, and then shot again by his mom, a wound not grievous enough to prevent him from stabbing her in the leg.

The rescue of wounded Franco and the trussed up Carly was finally accomplished by Anna and Nathan.  Franco and Carly  were seen declaring their love for one another.  How sweet. We can’t tell you how happy we are that two of the most unsavory characters in all of soap operas have finally found romantic nirvana with one another.

Three Couples and One Friendship to Watch in 2014

Romance is, after all, the soul of soap opera. So, if Franco and Carly don’t : warm your heart, here are three pairings that just might :

Ridge and Katie (Thorsten Kaye and Heather Tom) on The Bold and the Beautiful. These two characters, played by uncommonly terrific actors,  are in love but haven’t declared it yet.  You know that because they have had a recent romp in the park and suddenly Ridge and Katie have developed a mutual interest in poetry. Now they can read to each other, a particular treat when it’s Kaye’s turn, given his English accent and dulcet tones.

Ava and Morgan (Maura West and  Bryan Craig ) on General Hospital.  Who would have thought that a lurid affair between a 19 year old and an older woman could turn into GH’s deepest, most meaningful love story?  Chemistry and very good acting have lifted this pairing from something superficial to something sublime.

Julian and Alexis (William deVry and Nancy Lee Grahn) also on GH. Who would have thought that an almost renewed  affair between grandparents would be indescribably sexy? After all, this pair conceived Sam over three decades ago.  DeVry and Grahn have great chemistry despite what looks to be an age difference of about a decade.

And in the friendship department, keep an eye on Chloe and Chelsea (Elizabeth Hendrickson and Melissa Claire Egan) on The Young and the Restless. These two are best friends and are always refreshing to watch because of the great degree of honesty between them.  Chloe was right when Adam turned out to be a louse, running over and killing Delia.  What Chelsea didn’t count on was that Chloe was so jealous of her motherhood of Connor she’d wind up kidnapping him, as she did on Friday.

Is Bold and Beautiful Best Soap?

By Marlena De Lacroix a.k.a. Connie Passalacqua Hayman

Kimberly Matula: Her Hope stands on her own these days.

With only four daytime soaps left, it seems fruitless to name a Best Soap. It’s all a matter of personal preference anyway.  If you like your soaps slow and full of character, you like The Young and the Restless.  If you like your plots fast and full of surprises, General Hospital  is the soap for you.  Days of Our Lives is traditional soap, full of great twists and turns.

But there is one soap now that is undoubtedly the most consistently excellent — that’s The Bold and the Beautiful.  Ever since Rick settled down with Caroline, there hasn’t been a bum storyline.  Sure, the show is only a half hour and it features only two main storylines.  But both are quite good and full of suspense and interest.

B&B is very fortunate that their “young” storyline works.  Step-brothers Liam and Wyatt’s contest for the love of young Hope (Kimberly Matula) is one that seems to change every single day.  Liam is a bit full of himself and Wyatt is full of charm.  But Hope is remarkably mature, and is making a great show of the fact that she can stand on her own these days.  After all, she has a great career as head of the “Hope for the Future” line at Forrester Fashions.   All three characters in this triangle are strong and attractive.   Hope can most likely keep on bouncing between Liam and Wyatt in a storyline without end. And most likely she will!

The Brooke-Bill-Katie triangle has been a real winner for the show since it was established last year.  Forbidden (now ex) lovers Brooke and Bill are very sexy together and of course Katie (Brooke’s sister and Bill’s wife) suffers better than anyone on daytime television.  But it’s the latest addition to the triangle, Brooke’s long absentee husband Ridge, which promises great excitement in the new year.

We’ve already noted that Thorsten Kaye is terrific in the role of Ridge.  What was unexpected was how much potential his genuine acting ability has added to the show and the storyline he is in.  He’s brought out a new tenderness in Katherine Kelly Lang’s Brooke, and is just brilliant with multiple Emmy winner Heather Tom’s Katie.  It’s just been inferred in the storyline that Ridge may be interested in Katie.  What a complex, complicated, not to mention superbly-acted four-way (Brooke-Bill-Katie-Ridge) story that is going to make!

             So, what’s your pick for best of the four. Is it B&B or another? 

The Bold and the Beautiful: Is There Still Right and Wrong?

By Marlena De Lacroix a.k.a. Connie Passalacqua Hayman 

There she was in an evening dress with her beautiful blonde hair put up in a sophisticated bun, running through the streets of Monte Carlo.  All of a sudden she was caught up into the arms of a strong, dark  handsome man, and the two embraced in hard kiss.

Brooke and Bill are at it again.

Was it Grace Kelly and Cary Grant in the 1955  Alfred Hitchcock classic To Catch a Thief? No, it was Brooke Logan (Katherine Kelly Lang) running from and then being captured in the arms of Bill Spencer (Don Diamont) this week on The Bold and the Beautiful.

There was only one thing wrong with this beautiful footage on the classic soap.  Instead of rooting for Brooke and Bill, we were generally rooting against them.Which is very strange for a soap.  As we know, Bill is married to Katie (multi Emmy winner Heather Tom),  Brooke’s sister, and has been caught cheating on her with Brooke in the past.  Now, after Brooke miscarried Bill’s child, we were asked to root for the cheating  couple again, as the betrayed Katie dissolved into tears once more in the living room  of the Spencers’ Los Angeles mansion.

Is weepy Katie the architect of her own misery?

Was this new betrayal Katie’s fault? After all, Katie had set up a spying system of cameras and microphones in the same living room  to catch her husband and sister together.  Although they had acted innocently, Bill eventually found out about being spied upon and used his outrage as an excuse to pursue Brooke to Monte Carlo. Had Katie set herself up for misery yet again, by pushing Bill into Brooke’s arms?  She’s done it before!

So, whose side are we supposed to be on? B&B is asking viewers to choose, and it’s a difficult choice. Yes, yes, the heart has its reasons and all that. But seriously, is adultery still wrong?  We know it is, and so we root against Bill and Brooke.  Yet, on the other hand, they are a handsome, sexy and strangely alluring couple.  And yet, on the other other hand, we feel for poor Katie — always the victim, always awash in tears, betrayed by the two people she says she loves most in the world.

Is it right for a soap have a right to encourage fans root for what’s wrong?  Some might say old fashioned moral judgments are just too, well, old fashioned for today’s for soap viewers.   Or are they?  Do you share Marlena’s queasiness about the glamorous Brooke and Bill romance? Do you feel sorry for Katie, or do you think she brings about her own misery? Do you think this is a good soap story, or one that is at heart a love triangle that is too morally confusing for comfort? 

The Bold and the Beautiful Reaches a Pinnacle of Soapy Goodness!

By Marlene De Lacroix a.k.a. Connie Passalacqua Hayman

Every soap generation has its touchstone moment. It usually happens when a plot turn is so soapy good it earns your allegiance to its characters for decades.  Mine occurred on Another World in the 70s when Alice (Jacqueline Courtney), engaged to Steve (George Reinholt), found out her sister-in-law Rachel (Robin Strasser) was pregnant with Steve’s baby.  Oh, the magnificent melodramatic pain and heartbreak of it all!

Hasty horndogs Brooke and Bill

For younger soap viewers, such a touchstone moment may have occurred this week on The Bold and the Beautiful.  At Brooke’s birthday party, Taylor interrupted all the testimonials to Brooke’s virtue by blurting out the truth — that Brooke had slept with her brother-in-law Bill, getting pregnant.  At the time, wife Katie had taken off her wedding ring and lay unconscious in the hospital. Did horndogs Brooke and Bill have to hop into bed so fast? Quelle horreur!

These revelation scenes were so fantastic because they were almost a year in coming, and the actors really milked the episodes of emotions for all they were worth.  Exhibiting the talent and passion that brought Heather Tom three Best Actress Emmys, Katie wept piteously and became entirely bitter.  The excellent Katharine Kelly Lang as the cringewowrthy Brooke also cried, overwhelmed by the shame the character had truly earned. Most interestingly, Don Diamont as the ever arrogant Bill went on the defensive, saying Katie had driven him to sleep wIth Brooke by constantly throwing them together.  How could Katie – or any other woman — care for this incredible nasty bastard ever again? Playing the villainy it for all it was worth, Diamont was the perfect slime.  

Such great soap moments can only come together though the seamless work of cast, writers, producers and crew. The headwriter here was Bradley Bell, and Bell is also the show’s executive producer.   Individual episodes during the week were written by Adam Dusevoir and the great Patrick Mulcahey, an Emmy-winning veteran of Santa Barbara and General Hospital.

It was just another great week of well-acted, nicely written and hard-hitting drama on B&B — not to be forgotten, perhaps, by a new generation of viewers. And it’s not even sweeps month!

The Bold and the Beautiful: Three Into Two Won’t Go

By Marlena De Lacroix a.k.a. Connie Passalacqua Hayman

The Bold and the Beautiful is just past its 25th birthday and carries on doing  what it does best:   love triangles.  The show’s  theme might as well be, Three Into Two Won’t Go, which was the title  of an English movie I remember from 1969. Apart from the nifty title, it was a fairly pretentious Swinging Sixties exercise about a middle-aged man (Rod Steiger) who falls for a young woman hitchhiker (Judy Geeson), who proceeds to become a boarder in his and his wife’s (Claire Bloom) home. Soaps really do some things better from time to time, even without such a heavyweight cast.

Darin Brooks

Consider first the triangle that has all but consumed the show — Steffy-Liam-Hope. It’s finally at an end, though perhaps only temporarily if Jacqueline MacInnes Wood hasn’t really left the show for good, and is instead just on a long hiatus.  Wood did spectacular work on her way out as Steffy learned she  could never have children and left for Paris without appraising Liam of that fact.  Before  exiting, she “gave” Liam to Hope. But the ever  besotted Hope has just  met a new man, Wyatt, played by cute Emmy winner  Darin Brooks, who used to play Max on Days of Our Lives. So one good triangle smoothly should replace another. And it’s about time Hope stopped being so hung up on Liam, who did her wrong with Steffy numerous times.

Karla Mosely

Another promising new triangle is now arising, to be known henceforth as Maya-Rick-Caroline. Caroline wants to marry Rick, but now he only has eyes for Maya, an ex-con.  Lindsay Godfrey is immeasurably better now that her character has turned into a bad girl. But the show has a made a major find in sparkling Karla Mosley as Maya.  She plays strength and independence well, something unusual for a B&B heroine. As Rick, Jacob Young, an old soap pro, has the chops to play a very effective leading man to both women who are vying for his embrace.

But the best triangle on the show is Brooke-Bill-Katie.  Don Diamont, who plays Bill, and Katherine Kelly Lang, who plays Brooke, are an electric pairing with great sexual magnetism. Their attraction is forbidden and lurid Bill, who  is married to Brooke’s sister Katie, played by Heather Tom, who just won her third Daytime Emmy in the role. Brooke just dodged  a bullet: turns out she was not pregnant after all following a one night stand with Bill.  But that doesn’t mean this love triangle is over.  Au contraire.  On B&B love triangles have a habit of going on forever and with such a worthy cast, here’s hoping this one will, too. too. 

A Negative Vote on This Year’s Daytime Emmys

By Marlena De Lacroix a.k.a. Connie Passalacqua Hayman 

Last year I praised HLN’s first production of the Daytime Emmys because it was straightforward and lean.  This year’s show was exactly the opposite — overlong (almost three hours) and full of things that just shouldn’t have been included.  Boring!

Doug Davidson and his well-deserved and long overdue Best Actor award (Photo by Richard ShotwellInvision/AP)

How about that couch?  I’m talking about the one on which winners were interviewed by such “journalists” as Giada Di Laurantiis and Sheryl Underwood.  At least some of the winners — Best Actor Doug Davidson and Best Supporting Actress Julie Marie Berman, for instance — handled themselves well and with grace in the awkward situation.  There was just too much stuff stuffed into the show — like two Lifetime Achievement awards (Monty Hall and Bob Stewart) and presentation of three generic Best Song performances by co-host Robin Meade (who is at least a pretty woman with a nice voice).  Nancy Lee Grahn’s brief comedy bits filmed outdoors were not very good..

The whole problem with the show is that in content it aimed to be a major network presentation, but missed because of poor and cheap production.  It makes us remember and appreciate what a good job Dick Clark Productions did with the show over the years.  The hosts — Sam Champion, A.J. Hammer and Meade — were just meh, and scattershot appearances by them did nothing to keep the whole production feeling cohesive.  All in all, the 40th annual Daytime Emmys was a production not befitting of its own lofty aims or of the hard work done on daytime television by so many creative people over the year.

The winners in most of the acting categories, on the other hand, were well chosen.  Finally, Davidson deservedly won his Best Actor statuette after 35 years in the show in a very emotional storyline on The Young and the Restless (Paul shot his would-be murderer son Ricky.)   The Bold and the Beautiful’s Heather Tom always excels, particularly in her storyline in which Katie suffered a near-psychotic breakdown after the birth of her son.  And General Hospital’s Julie Marie Berman’s win as Best Supporting Actress was a good parting gift from the show.

Speaking of GH, wasn’t the show shortchanged in a year when the big awards (Best Show, Best Writing, Best Direction) went to B&B. Not that B&B had a bad year (it was very good, especially with the scenes leading up to Stephanie’s death), but GH literally had its finest years in decades, an everyday must-see show which corrected the mistakes made by the horribly crime-centric longtime headwriter Bob Guza.  Except for an underserved award for Best Young Actress to Kristen Alderson (while she was still playing Starr Manning), GH deserved many more awards and  rewards this year.

On Days of Our Lives, Chandler Massey was rewarded for a very nice job with Best Younger Actor. Then the show went on to score the evening’s the real upset – Days won as Best Soap.  As bitterly noted by executive producer Ken Corday in his acceptance speech, this was the first time in 38 years the show had won the ultimate award.

So, Thinking Fans, did Days deserve it?

The 40th Annual Daytime Emmy Nominations: Some Killer Choices!

By Marlena De Lacroix a.k.a. Connie Passalacqua Hayman

What do you think of the 40th Annual Daytime Emmy nominees?  The list is long and illustrative given the fact that there are only four soaps.  Several categories are full of names that are most deserving. It would be very hard to cast a decisive vote should one have the opportunity.

Katherine Kelly Lang

Consider the lead actor category:  You’ve got an actor who created a real splash in General Hospital this year, Jason Thompson, who was brilliant as his Patrick Drake mourned the death of his wife Robin.  Then you’ve got the always dependable actors in the category — Peter Bergman (Jack, The Young and the Restless), Doug Davidson (Paul, Y&R) and Michael Muhney (Adam, Y&R).  Although Muhney is a great personal favorite of mine, I don’t know who did the superior job of all these outstanding actors.

Then there’s lead actress:  Who can beat Susan Flannery, who played Stephanie’s march to death so memorably on The Bold and the Beautiful? Or Heather Tom, who played Katie’s post-partum depression, also on B&B? Also excellent as was Days of Our Lives’ Peggy McCay who played Caroline’s Alzheimer’s suffering so skillfully.  Formidable, too, is Y&R’s always dependable Michelle Stafford (Phyllis), who also shone in that category.  Again, who to vote for?

For Best Supporting Actress, I’d definitely cast my vote for first time nominee (it’s about time) Katherine Kelly Lang of B&B, who played Stephanie’s best friend Brooke so beautifully and soulfully through Stephanie’s fabulously written final story. Here is an actress who has grown incredibly since her debut on the show 25 years ago, and definitely deserves recognition, not just for this year but for her long body of work.

And what about Best Show?  Can anyone beat GH, which had one of the best years in its history?  On the other hand, it’s hard to top B&B, with its brilliantly produced stories of Katie’s post-partum depression and the death of Stephanie.

Talk about killer choices. With only four surviving soaps contributing nominees, the work the voters had to choose from is all exciting and memorable. No matter who wins, the quality of all the nominees argues persuasively for the future of network soaps. Here’s hoping TPTB are paying attention.

This year’s Emmy Award ceremonies will be broadcast June 16 on HLN.

Sunday Reflections 21: Two Award-worthy Stories on The Bold and the Beautiful … On General Hospital – Maxie, Forget Being a Surrogate Mother!

By Marlena De Lacroix a.k.a. Connie Passalacqua Hayman

The Bold and the Beautiful:  While the rest of us were distracted by the fireworks of General Hospital’s highly entertaining, twist-filled November sweeps (A.J. back from the dead! Duke is Faison!), perhaps the finest dramatic work of the month or even the year was going on over at The Bold and the Beautiful. Two storylines — Stephanie’s death and Katie’s postpartum depression — are the kind of meaningful stories that win Emmy awards in both acting and writing.

Stephanie’s tearful good-bye
Susan Flannery ends a magnificent 25-year run

Of course, headwriter Bradley Bell had plenty of advance notice to write and plan the road to Stephanie’s death — actress Susan Flannery had announced she was retiring months before.  But the story he constructed both highlighted Flannery’s legendary talents (honed over 43 years in the business) and saluted the unique emotional strength of daytime’s premiere matriarch.  Stephanie had no fear of death.  Who else would have the courage and composure to plan their own Celebration of Life party? Flannery left the entire B&B company verklempt for real as Stephanie so poignantly said farewell to her guests when she departed for Big Bear, never to see her relatives and friends again. The party episodes were so intense!

But not as intense as Stephanie’s dying scenes, which Bell brilliantly chose to have her share with Brooke, not husband Eric.  The two women are the loves of each other’s lives, n’est ce- pas?   Bell finally chose the death sequence for Brooke to confirm that the two women loved each other as Stephanie gave Brooke her engagement ring and Brooke declared, “I never knew love until there was you.”  It was the fitting conclusion of a twenty- five year cat and mouse game that started with hate and then went to obsession and finally ended with confession of the emotional truth.  I always felt all along that through all the years of mutual conflict and bitchery, Steph and Brooke really loved each other intensely. What do you think?

Katherine Kelly Lang

Katherine Kelly Lang, who is unjustly always short-changed at awards time, did the most sensitive and memorable work of her 25 years on the show throughout November. Brooke’s eyes were constantly rimmed with the sincere tears of grief and love.  Also doing the kind of work that merits an award was Heather Tom (she won Best Actress last year) as new mother Katie, who totally disappeared into the terrifying disease of post-partum depression.   It was so severe she even left her husband and child at home and ran away.

I salute the exploration of this disease on B&B, because it’s hardly ever been done in daytime history.  Perhaps because the disease is so protracted and ugly?   But it is so common and wide-spread!  B&B spared no unpleasant truth [Read more...]

The Bold and the Beautiful: Sadism in the Afternoon

Bridget

Thinking Fans Comment Update July 19: Purple Haze questions Bridget’s sanity … Levi says the whole story is unrealistic … renee has a new definition of B&B … and more.  See Comments below.

____________

By Marlena De Lacroix

In college or on DVD,  did you seen the cult movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)?  There’s a sweet. funny  character called The Black Knight (played by John Cleese), whose simple duty it is to guard a bridge in Medieval times.  In a battle one day, his right  arm is cut off.  Then later, he is shorn of his left arm. He says happily, “It’s only a flesh wound.”  In another skirmish, he loses a leg and, still cheerful, hops around on one leg.   And then on another day, the Knight loses his left leg, but not his optimism.  His torso is seen hopping wildly across the landscape, as he whistles happily.           

That  to me is the character of Bridget Forrester on The Bold and the Beautiful.  Even in a medium where it’s an expected practice to cause heroines  heartbreak, the degradation of Dr. Bridget is reaching [Read more...]